Flint Eats
Flint Eats

Flint Eats

Helping Flint eat healthy food.

This mobile application will enable residents to share and discover information about local food. A beta version of application is is currently available for iOS and Android! Weekly updates will be made to improve the app, and the fully functional app is scheduled to launch in the summer of 2018.

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Objectives

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To create a platform for information sharing between the residents of Flint about quality and cost of food available from Local Food Retailers.

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To create a platform for Flint Residents to share knowledge about food preparation and nutritional value.

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To provide Flint Retailers with an opportunity to advertise affordable, healthy food to Flint Residents

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To create incentives for Local Food Retailers to provide healthy, high quality food in safe, friendly, accessible environments.

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To establish a community oversight process that will guide the design of the app and its integration with local businesses and community-base organizations.

technology

Technology

The centerpiece of this effort is a mobile application that will enable resident to share and discover information about local food. The application will provide three kinds of functionality:

Map-based interface

A map-based interface, indicating where all Local Food Retailers are located (including farmer’s markets and corner stores), providing quick visual indicators about the quality of food offerings (according to Flint Residents).

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app with food

Community Connection

A social feed, where people can create and discuss different types of food related content, including deals, reviews, recipes, and tips.

Reference Library

A reference library, where people can learn about foods and find a complete and up-to- date index of Local Food Retailers in Flint.

History

The Flint Eats project holds partnerships with Michigan State University Extension’s SNAP-Ed program, the Michigan Department of Education, Michigan State University researchers, and stakeholders in the Flint community. Due to several factors, the accessibility of healthy food in Flint has become a challenge.The research team has identified two core problems, which the Flint Eats project is intended to address:

lightbulb iconLack of access, due to numerous issues historical and structural issues including transportation, safety, and poor food quality available within the city limits.

thumbs up iconLack of trust, leading to reduced information sharing that might otherwise generate market pressure that could improve retail practices surrounding food.